Dr. Böger on ProArgi-9+, ADMA and Synergy

Wednesday, October 09, 2013


Earlier today, Dr. Rainer Böger called from Germany to be joined by a large number of listeners. As this month's Cardio Call special guest, he explained ProArgi-9+ and the way it acts in the body. If you were unable to join the call don't worry— the call has been recorded and you can listen to it here at your convenience.


Click to listen to the 2013 October Cardio Call with Dr. Rainer Böger.


Remember, you can listen to a variety of past Cardio Call recordings at any time by clicking the "Resources" tab at the top of this page.

Dr. Böger on ADMA

Some of the major achievements of Dr. Böger's career involve his research on asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) as a risk marker of vascular disease. In today's Cardio Call, he took time to address the subject of ADMA and a misunderstanding that is becoming all too common in the industry.

Some have suggested that because ADMA blocks l-arginine that it thereby cancels out all potential benefits of ProArgi-9+ in the body. However, the truth as pointed out by Dr. Böger is that the presence of ADMA in a person's body is the very reason high quality l-arginine supplementation is so necessary.

"We see 2 out of 3 people have a deficite in l-arginine," says Dr. Böger. "This, in most people, is not true because they have such low levels of arginine in the blood, but because they have high levels of ADMA in the blood. When someone has high ADMA, that person is in need of additional arginine from a dietary supplement. People who have high ADMA have a high need of l-arginine from ProArgi-9+. We have data to show that for explicitly those with a high ADMA, l-arginine supplements will work well. For those with a low ADMA, the need to have a high dose of arginine supplements is not so great."

Be sure to listen to the rest of the recording as he explores this subject in greater detail.

About Dr. Böger

Professor Rainer H. Böger, MD, is a leading expert in L-arginine research and member of Synergy’s Medical and Scientific Advisory Board.

After receiving his initial medical training at Hannover Medical School in Hannover, Germany, Dr. Böger then received his postgraduate training in Internal Medicine and Pharmacology both in Hannover and at Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, CA.

Dr. Böger is currently the Professor of Clinical Pharmacology and Director of the Institute of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology at Hamburg University Medical Center, Germany. He is also Director of the Clinical Trial Center North at Hamburg University.

Dr. Böger’s scientific work centers on the early diagnosis and prevention of cardiovascular related diseases. Dating back to the beginning of his medical career, Dr. Böger has been heavily involved in the research and treatment of cardiovascular related diseases. In 1991, while working closely with pharmaceutical drug companies to develop treatments that could combat and alleviate such diseases, he became highly interested in nitric oxide (NO) and its effects on the vascular system.

Over 23 years of academic research has been conducted by Dr. Böger in basic science and clinical studies related to L-arginine and its influence on the body’s ability to produce NO.
Dr. Böger collaborates with renowned institutions like the Mayo Clinic and Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Böger’s extensive knowledge, expertise, and ongoing research clearly set him apart as one of the world’s leading L-arginine experts

Join us for next month's Cardio Call on November 13, 2013.

Synergy WorldWide

Some say he’s half man half fish, others say he’s more of a seventy/thirty split. Either way he’s a fishy bastard.

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